The virtues of desdemona in othello by william shakespeare

Addressing the Prevalent Racism Shakespeare lived in a time when racism was prevalent and racial discrimination and segregation were acceptable norms in developed societies and civilizations. He tried to shorten the gaping divide between the white race and peoples of color. It meant to counter the commonly accepted philosophy of racial superiority of the white race hence it was bound to create waves and controversy in a time when slavery was perfectly acceptable in human societies.

The virtues of desdemona in othello by william shakespeare

Basically, he does it because he is a bad man. A very bad man in fact. In modern language we would call him a complete psychopath. He is very good at being charming, friendly, sensitive, intelligent, caring, understanding, sympathetic etc etc.

He gives some reasons for his actions Cyprus is an island near Turkey and Greece. It is strategically very very important for controlling Mediterranean trade routes. It is his nature to seek delight in tormenting and persecuting his victims. The more they smart under the pain and suffering, the greater grows his happiness.

This is the malignant nature of Iago, and to rationalise this malignity of his nature he hunts for motives. Even if there had been no motives to direct him to these revengeful misdeeds against Othello, Desdemona, and Cassio, he would have proceeded against them merely for the joy of watching their joy and discomfiture.

The virtues of desdemona in othello by william shakespeare

That is not to say that Iago is an inhuman abstraction Acc. Ridleybut suffice to say that Acc.

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And almost all of these motives appear and disappear in the most extraordinary manner. Hatred of Othello is expressed in the First Act alone. Bradley has explained so clearly in the above quotation. He fishes out flimsy motives to convince the audience that he has reasonable grounds to work against the Moor.

But as a matter of fact, the grounds on which he proceeds are vague and well defined and nebulous in their nature. The maliciousness and malignity of Iago does not spring from the causes to which he himself alludes in his speeches and soliloquies. His malignity is founded on envy and jealousy.

His malignity is very deep seated. It is not possible for him to endure the sight of happy people. He cannot tolerate the happiness and marital bliss of Othello and Desdemona and tries to undermine their happiness and destroy their lives.

The malignity of Iago is visible in his wicked remark: Later on, he derives morbid delight out of laying out his own plan for destroying Cassio and Desdemona. He derives a diabolical pleasure out of the frustration and ruin of his victims, and it is merely a sport for him to watch his victims squealing in pain.

The virtues of desdemona in othello by william shakespeare

The words that come out of his sinful lips at the disturbed and agitated state of Othello are devilish and disclose his inherent malignity: He is eminently successful in the plans and schemes which he engineers against these three victims.

The question that naturally rises is: Apparently and so far as all outward appearances are concerned; Iago has certain definite and well-defined motives for the action which he undertakes against Cassio and Othello.

The main cause of complaint and grudge which Iago has against Othello is that instead of appointing him as his lieutenant, he has chosen Cassio for this post, and has given to him Iago the humiliating and low rank of the ensign or the ancient or the standard-bearer. The appointment of Cassio as lieutenant in preference to his own valiant self-gnaws deep into the heart of Iago and makes him angry with the Moor because he has chosen a mere arithmetician, a debtor and creditor, and a counter-caster i.

Cassio, as his lieutenant and has ignored his claims, when he knows that Michael Cassio: Actuated by these motives, he seeks to bring about the ruin of these people. But these motives are considered too feeble by critics, for the kind of action that Iago actually takes against his victims.

He is simply trying to hunt motives in order to justify his malignity against virtuous and innocent people. His real motives lie elsewhere and are deeply rooted in his inherent malignity and evil mindedness.

If you look at the line in act 1 scene 1 when Iago suggests that Othello has slept with Emilia he only says 'he has heard' or something to that matter, and that if it be rumoured, it is good enough to be true. Iago truly is the master of manipulation, often dubbed the greatest villain in Shakespeare, and one of the best parts to be played.

Perhaps Iago is only doing this to everyone because he can? The answer above states it is because he has been passed over for promotion; however Othello makes him the lieutenant in Act 3 Scene 3, thus making this motive invalid.

So, what does Iago himself say about his own motives? In Act V, write towards the end of the play, Iago says- Demand me nothing: From this time forth I never will speak a word. And Iago is as good as that word since these are his last lines in the play.is and in to a was not you i of it the be he his but for are this that by on at they with which she or from had we will have an what been one if would who has her.

This webpage is for Dr. Wheeler's literature students, and it offers introductory survey information concerning the literature of classical China, classical Rome, classical Greece, the Bible as Literature, medieval literature, Renaissance literature, and genre studies.

Do Othello and Desdemona Ever Consummate Their Marriage? Shakespeare scholar Harold Bloom thinks that Desdemona's virginity is the big driving question of the play. Bloom argues that Othello and Desdemona never had .

Shakespeare's Desdemona is a Venetian beauty who enrages and disappoints her father, a Venetian senator, when she elopes with Othello, a Moorish man several years her senior.

When her husband is deployed to Cyprus in the service of the Republic of Venice, Desdemona accompanies him. It looks like you've lost connection to our server. Please check your internet connection or reload this page.

monologues male () A DAY IN THE DEATH OF JOE EGG by Peter Nicholls (ADAPTED) - BRIT A FEW GOOD MEN by Aaron Sorkin - LT. COL. JESSUP A LIE OF THE MINDby Sam Shepard - FRANKIE A LIE OF THE MIND by Sam Shepard - JAKE A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS by Robert Bolt - MORE A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM (ACT 3, SCENE 2) by William Shakespeare - PUCK A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM (ACT 4, SCENE 1) by William. This webpage is for Dr. Wheeler's literature students, and it offers introductory survey information concerning the literature of classical China, classical Rome, classical Greece, the Bible as Literature, medieval literature, Renaissance literature, and genre studies. Do Othello and Desdemona Ever Consummate Their Marriage? Shakespeare scholar Harold Bloom thinks that Desdemona's virginity is the big driving question of the play. Bloom argues that Othello and Desdemona never had .

Like the audience, Desdemona seems able only to watch as her husband is driven insane with jealousy. Though she maintains to the end that she is “guiltless,” Desdemona also forgives her husband (iridis-photo-restoration.com ).

Her forgiveness of Othello may help the audience to forgive him as well.

Iago Character Introduction